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What should you avoid before an endoscopy?

Preparing for the procedure

  • 7 days before endoscopy. Stop taking iron, aspirin, aspirin products, or Pepto Bismol.
  • 5 days before endoscopy. Stop taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (e.g. Motrin, Advil (ibuprofen), Feldene, Naprosyn, Nuprin, Celebrex and Vioxx).
  • 1 day before endoscopy.
  • Day of endoscopy.

What can I eat 2 days before endoscopy?

You can have: White bread, pasta, and rice. Well-cooked vegetables without skin. Fruit without skin or seeds….Don’t eat:

  • Seeds, nuts, or popcorn.
  • Fatty foods.
  • Tough meat.
  • Whole grains.
  • Raw vegetables.
  • Fruit with seeds or peel.
  • Corn, broccoli, cabbage, beans, or peas.

What is considered a light meal before endoscopy?

Night Before Your Test: Eat a light meal for supper, preferably one with soft foods like mashed potatoes, Jello, etc. Do not eat or drink anything red-colored.

What is a light breakfast before endoscopy?

Examples of a light breakfast are: eggs, soup or broth with noodles (no meat or vegetables), white crackers, white rice, white potatoes, white bread, Boost® or Ensure®. At 10:00 am, begin a clear liquid diet. Do not eat anything solid.

Will I be asleep during endoscopy?

All endoscopic procedures involve some degree of sedation, which relaxes you and subdues your gag reflex. Being sedated during the procedure will put you into a moderate to deep sleep, so you will not feel any discomfort when the endoscope is inserted through the mouth and into the stomach.

What are the risks of endoscopy?

Overall, endoscopy is very safe; however, the procedure does have a few potential complications, which may include:

  • Perforation (tear in the gut wall)
  • Reaction to sedation.
  • Infection.
  • Bleeding.
  • Pancreatitis as a result of ERCP.

Can a person die during endoscopy?

Conclusions: A causal death rate of 1 in 9000 suggests that EGD is very safe. However, certain patient groups have an increased mortality, and the risks and benefits of EGD should be carefully evaluated in each patient.

Is there an alternative to endoscopy?

The most common alternative to endoscopy is an upper GI x-ray examination using a barium swallow. This procedure does not allow for biopsy or removal of tissue and is not able to identify flat lesions; if abnormalities are detected with the upper GI x-ray examination, an endoscopy will be required.

When can I eat after endoscopy?

When you feel you can do so, start slow by sipping water or other cool liquids. Over the next 24-48 hours, eat small meals consisting of soft, easily-digestible foods like soups, eggs, juices, pudding, applesauce, etc. You should also avoid consuming alcohol for at least 24 hours after your procedure.

How long is endoscopy recovery?

After an upper GI endoscopy, you can expect the following: to stay at the hospital or outpatient center for 1 to 2 hours after the procedure so the sedative can wear off. to rest at home for the rest of the day. bloating or nausea for a short time after the procedure.

Is it normal to have a headache after endoscopy?

While headaches aren’t overly-common after a colonoscopy, they do happen. Odds are you missed this side-effect in the fine-print because you were more concerned with other issues pertaining to your procedure. In almost all cases, a post-colonoscopy headache is nothing to worry about.

Is it normal to have difficulty swallowing after an endoscopy?

Although complications after upper endoscopy are very uncommon, it’s important to recognize early signs of possible complications. Contact your doctor immediately if you have a fever after the test or if you notice trouble swallowing or increasing throat, chest or abdominal pain, or bleeding, including black stools.

Can you lose your voice after an endoscopy?

You may have a mild sore throat or hoarseness after the procedure. This is because of the tube and the anesthetic. You may feel nauseated today. This sometimes happens because of the medications that are used.

Is coughing normal after endoscopy?

Coughing or vomiting during the endoscopic procedure resulted in a 156.12-fold increased risk of respiratory complications (95% CI: 67.44 – 361.40) and 520.87-fold increased risk of requiring antibiotic treatment (95% CI: 178.01 – 1524.05).