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When does postpartum period begin?

The postpartum (or postnatal) period begins immediately after childbirth as the mother’s body, including hormone levels and uterus size, returns to a non-pregnant state. The terms puerperium, puerperal period, or immediate postpartum period are commonly used to refer to the first six weeks following childbirth.

Can your period fluctuate while breastfeeding?

If you begin menstruating again while you’re breastfeeding, you may experience spotting and irregular periods and wonder what’s going on. It’s completely normal to have inconsistent cycles when you’re breastfeeding a baby, and you can chalk it up to the same hormones that caused amenorrhea.

Is first period after breastfeeding heavy?

The first postpartum period may be heavier and more painful than those before pregnancy, or it may be lighter and easier. Some women have their first postpartum period shortly after lochia, while others may wait many months, especially if they are breastfeeding.

Why are periods more painful postpartum?

Some women experience heavier, longer or more painful periods after having a baby. These changes may relate to a larger uterine cavity causing more endometrium (mucous lining the uterus) to shed.

Do menstrual cramps get better after having a baby?

Sooner or later after childbirth and breastfeeding, your menstrual cycle will resume. But here’s a welcome side effect: You may have fewer bothersome cramps. Some women even find that menstrual pain ceases altogether after pregnancy and childbirth.

Are painful periods a sign of good fertility?

While painful periods themselves are not linked to fertility issues, some of the causes behind the pain are associated with infertility. Some of these conditions can get worse over time, which is why getting diagnosed and treated early is important.

How long does it take for your bump to go after C-section?

“Immediately after delivery, the uterus will be at the level of your belly button, which is reminiscent of being 20 weeks pregnant,” Ross says. “Women tend to look pregnant for another six to nine weeks as the uterus and saggy, post-baby belly find their way back to normal.”

Do and don’ts after C section delivery?

Monitor your breathing, blood pressure, wound dressing and if you need any more or less pain relief. Give you compression stockings to reduce chances of blood clots. Check how much vaginal bleeding you have and if your maternity pad needs changing. Put in a catheter to drain the urine from your bladder.

Can you lie on your side after C section?

Specifically, you should focus on sleeping on your left side since this gives you optimal blood flow and also makes digestion easier. You may need a body pillow or other supportive aids to get comfortable and provide proper support for your abdomen and hips.

Does breastfeeding tighten your stomach?

Can breastfeeding help make your belly smaller? Yes! This is yet another reason to breastfeed. Breastfeeding is associated with profound uterine contractions (nope, you’re not done with those—sorry!), so you may feel some pretty intense abdominal pains when you breastfeed during the first couple weeks.